The parish family is blessed to have among its midst such competent musicians as Geoff Little and Anne Holt who for many years have each offered their talents for the glory of God and beautification of the liturgy!

Fr Michael White speaks very powerfully about the importance of all who attend Mass participating fully and consciously.  In particular he has the following to say: One of the most commonly used words in the Bible is “sing”.  We, as the People of God, are supposed to sing.  …  This is what Moses and Israel did in response to their saving passage through the Red Sea; it’s what David and the people did as they brought the Ark of the Covenant to Jerusalem; its what Jesus and His disciples did the night before He died (for the Last Supper was not a “quiet” Mass)!  We should be led into singing the praises of God.  …  In other words singing and discipleship go together.  … Going to Mass and not singing is like going to the gym and not working out!

The Importance of Singing

[39] The Christian faithful who come together as one in expectation of the Lord’s coming are instructed by the Apostle Paul to sing together Psalms, hymns, and spiritual canticles (cf. Col 3: 16). Singing is the sign of the heart’s joy (cf. Acts 2: 46). Thus St.Augustine says rightly, ‘Singing is for one who loves’, and there is also an ancient proverb: ‘Whoever sings well prays twice over’.

[40] Great importance should therefore be attached to the use of singing in the celebration of the Mass, with due consideration for the culture of peoples and abilities of each liturgical assembly. Although it is not always necessary (e.g., in weekday Masses) to sing all the texts that are in principle meant to be sung, every care should be taken that singing by the ministers and the people not be absent in celebrations that occur on

Sundays and on Holydays of Obligation.  However, in the choosing of the parts actually to be sung, preference is to be given to those that are of greater importance and especially to those which are to be sung by the Priest or the Deacon or a reader, with the people replying, or by the Priest and people together.

[41] The main place should be given, all things being equal, to Gregorian chant, as being proper to the Roman Liturgy. Other kinds of sacred music, in particular polyphony, are in no way excluded, provided that they correspond to the spirit of the liturgical action and that they foster the participation of all the faithful. Since the faithful from different countries come together ever more frequently, it is desirable that they know how to sing together at least some parts of the Ordinary of the Mass in Latin, especially the Profession of Faith and the Lord’s Prayer, according to the simpler settings.

[96] Moreover, they are to form one body, whether in hearing the Word of God, or in taking part in the prayers and in the singing, or above all by the common offering of the Sacrifice and by participating together at the Lord’s table. This unity is beautifully apparent from the gestures and bodily postures observed together by the faithful.

[103] Among the faithful, the schola cantorum or choir exercises its own liturgical function, its place being to take care that the parts proper to it, in keeping with the different genres of chant, are properly carried out and to foster the active participation of the faithful by means of the singing.  What is said about the schola cantorum also applies, with due regard for the relevant norms, to other musicians, and especially the organist.

[104] It is fitting that there be a cantor or a choir director to direct and support the people’s singing. Indeed, when there is no choir, it is up to the cantor to direct the different chants, with the people taking the part proper to them.

[115]  By Mass with the people is meant a Mass celebrated with the participation of the faithful. Moreover, it is appropriate, insofar as possible, and especially on Sundays and Holydays of Obligation, that the celebration take place with singing and with a suitable number of ministers.  It may, however, take place even without singing and with only one minister.

[312] The schola cantorum (choir) should be so positioned with respect to the arrangement of each church that its nature may be clearly evident, namely as part of the assembled community of the faithful undertaking a specific function. The positioning should also help the choir to exercise this function more easily and allow each choir member full sacramental participation in the Mass in a convenient manner.

[313] The organ and other lawfully approved musical instruments should be placed in a suitable place so that they can sustain the singing of both the choir and the people and be heard with ease by everybody if they are played alone. It is appropriate that before being put into liturgical use, the organ be blessed according to the rite described in the Roman Ritual.  In Advent the use of the organ and other musical instruments should be marked by a moderation suited to the character of this time of year, without expressing in anticipation the full joy of the Nativity of the Lord.  In Lent the playing of the organ and musical instruments is allowed only in order to support the singing. Exceptions, however, are Laetare Sunday (Fourth Sunday of Lent), Solemnities, and Feasts.

The numbers refer to the General Instruction of the Roman Missal (GIRM), England and Wales 

IHM Sunday Mass Music

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8th May 2016
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1st May 2016
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24th April 2016
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17th April 2016
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17th April 2016
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9th April 2016
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3rd April 2016
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13th March 2016
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6th March 2016
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28th February 2016
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21st February 2016
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14th February 2016